Born out of Washington, D.C.'s revitalized punk and hardcore scenes, Flasher is what happens when punk grows up. Featuring guitarist Taylor Mulitz (Priests), bassist Daniel Saperstein (Bless), and drummer Emma Baker (Big Hush), the trio's self-titled cassette is a moody and lush affair with hushed, dueling vocals that dart in and out of shadows.

Here's a list of shiny things Aaron Lee Tasjan's Silver Tears brings to mind:

First Listen: TOY, 'Clear Shot'

12 hours ago

Altered consciousness, dreamy detachment and a healthy streak of escapism have long been hallmarks of psychedelic music. TOY is well aware of this — but at the same time, the British band is savvy enough to know just how far a pop song can be pushed, pulled and stretched. On the group's first two albums, 2012's TOY and 2013's Join The Dots, infectious indie rock bleeds into trippy studio effects, hypnotic rhythms and otherworldy textural manipulation.

Punk rock is not terribly romantic, or at least not enough to get an on-air dedication from Delilah. That's not to say punk rock doesn't know, understand and screw up relationships — it's just that the gooey underbelly of love and lust is mostly left to belters and crooners.

I've always thought Nina Diaz was fierce.

Phil Chess, co-founder of the iconic Chicago blues and rock 'n' roll label Chess Records, died Wednesday in Tucson, Ariz. He was 95.

Phil and his brother, Leonard Chess, emigrated to the U.S. from Poland in 1928. Chess Records biographer Nadine Cohodas told their story to NPR in 2000.

"It was a scrappy kind of existence," Cohodas said of the Chess brothers' early years in Chicago. "Their father was very determined and he opened a junk shop, as did many other immigrants from Eastern Europe."

The cast recording of Lazarus, the musical David Bowie wrote with playwright Enda Walsh, is out this week, and with it arrives three previously unreleased Bowie songs recorded during his Blackstar sessions. "Killing A Little Time" is the third track to leak from the album, and it's an ominous, polyrhythmic rock scorcher that would have fit well on the icon's final album. It's one of the last songs he recorded before his death from liver cancer in January.

Ruminations is one of Conor Oberst's most personal records — and it was a surprise, even for its creator. He didn't intend to make an album — he was trying to recover from exhaustion after he was rattled by a health scare, a cyst on his brain. But when he left New York, N.Y., and moved back to his hometown of Omaha, Neb., the songs started coming. He recorded Ruminations on piano, guitar and harmonica in 48 hours during the winter after he moved home.

Chuck Berry turns 90 Tuesday. I know he's a very important person in music history, but he's never been a guy I listened to much. I mean, I've heard hits like "Maybellene" from 1955, but I wanted to learn more.

So I called Tony Trov. He's an artist out of Philadelphia, but more important, he plays in a Chuck Berry cover band called It's Marvin, Your Cousin Marvin Berry, a reference to a memorable scene in Back to the Future.

The new album from the experimental rock band Negativland comes with a plastic bag containing 2 grams of Don Joyce's cremated remains. Joyce, a member of the group, died of heart failure in 2015. According to an official announcement on Boing Boing, the band's forthcoming album, The Chopping Channel, will ship with little bags of Joyce's ashes for as long as "supplies last."