Music

Youth Lagoon On World Cafe

Sep 4, 2013

Youth Lagoon is the work of Boise, Idaho's Trevor Powers. The title of his first album, 2011's The Year of Hibernation, captures what was going on: a solo bedroom project that explored the theme of emerging from isolation. It sounded great, and the positive response got Powers out of the bedroom and on the road for a year.

Everybody Loves John Fogerty

Sep 4, 2013

Imagine you wrote some of the most enduring songs in 1960s rock, but then got so mired in legal and financial issues with those same songs that you felt you couldn't play them.

On this week's episode of All Songs Considered, ­co-hosts Bob Boilen and Robin Hilton jump into fall by playing songs from big upcoming releases by Paul McCartney, Moby and Tim Hecker.

For a year and a half now, Morning Edition has been following the singer-songwriter Neko Case as she worked on an album that would come to be titled The Worse Things Get, The Harder I Fight, The Harder I Fight, The More I Love You. It includes "Where Did I Leave That Fire," a song with a haunting question at its heart, and now we know that the singer who asked where she left that fire was feeling depressed. She felt like she was moving through life underwater.

KEXP Presents: Ty Segall

Sep 2, 2013

The Portland-area Pickathon festival is most commonly associated with roots music, but in recent years has stretched out to include performers in other genres, including garage rocker Ty Segall. On his new album Sleeper, the prolific young Bay Area musician set aside the metal riffs and psychedelic freakouts of his previous recordings for a more acoustic translation of his glam-rock, space-rock and prog-rock influences.

A Brother Duo Digs Deep For The Blues

Sep 1, 2013

Steve Gunn: Tiny Desk Concert

Aug 31, 2013

"Do you know of any good liquor stores in town? Or, better yet, record stores?" Steve Gunn asks me after playing a mesmerizing set at the NPR Music offices. He's a record collector with insatiable taste and a vinyl-packed apartment. His ears perk up when I tell him that Future Times co-owner Andrew Field-Pickering (a.k.a.

We get a lot of mail at NPR Music, and amid our next-door neighbor's copy of Soldier of Fortune is a slew of smart questions about how music fits into our lives — and, this week, multiple requests for help deciding when it's time to bail on an outdated music format.

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