Music

Alex Ebert, Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros' lead singer, says that "Edward Sharpe" was originally a character that he made up to hide behind. In today's conversation, Ebert says that he and "Edward" have merged, to a certain extent. Still, he says, there's a tension between his invented persona and reality — which is why the cover of the band's latest album, PersonA, displays the name "Edward Sharpe" crossed out.

This week, we've got a surprise: Bob Boilen and Robin Hilton both went on vacation and left the All Songs studio unlocked. Apparently neither one of them uses two-step verification, so it took only a very minor effort for a couple of highly skilled NPR Music team members, Daoud Tyler-Ameen and Saidah Blount, to hack into the elaborate system of tubes, funnels and hamster wheels that feed podcasts from our microphones into your earbuds for a very special takeover edition of All Songs Considered.

World Cafe Next: Weaves

Aug 8, 2016

The Toronto four-piece Weaves seems poised to have a long career of pushing the boundaries while still letting audiences in. The band is fronted by singer Jasmyn Burke, whose energy you don't even have to witness live to appreciate.

Weaves' self-titled LP came out this past June. Take a listen to these two tracks, and you'll hear an art-rock quartet that might sound a little like a cross between PJ Harvey and Talking Heads.

Mitski On World Cafe

Aug 8, 2016

The indie-rock singer-songwriter Mitski released her fourth album, Puberty 2, this past June. She recorded her first two albums, which were rather orchestral, while a student at the SUNY Purchase Conservatory of Music. It wasn't until her third album that she added punkish guitars, and she describes Puberty 2 as an outgrowth of that album.

August 8, 2016

World Cafe #TBT: 1993

Aug 4, 2016

For Throwback Thursday, we're re-airing a 2011 Liz Phair session on today's episode of World Cafe. Phair's debut album, Exile In Guyville, came out in 1993 and was a huge success, topping Pitchfork's list that year.

A Moon Shaped Pool, Radiohead's ninth and quietest record, owes much of its sound to the band's visionary guitarist, violist, electronics wiz and arranger Jonny Greenwood. On this week's All Songs +1 podcast I talk with him about how A Moon Shaped Pool came to be.

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