Music

Frightened Rabbit On World Cafe

Jul 8, 2016

Upon hearing Frightened Rabbit's 2008 album Midnight Organ Fight, it was easy to fall in love with songwriter and lead singer Scott Hutchison's self-deprecating everyman persona. Still, the U.S. hadn't fully embraced the Glasgow band until its most recent album, Painting Of A Panic Attack, released earlier this year.

 

The band plays at the Alaska State Fair with special Guest July Talk Sunday August 28th 6:00pm.

Follow KNBA on Facebook to learn about ticket giveaways to the show!

 

 

The band’s new album, Egomanic, featuring their latest single “Take It From Me,” is spinning on the Afternoon Music Show on KNBA.

Author Bob Mehr has written the biography of The Replacements that fans have been awaiting for a long time. For Trouble Boys: The True Story Of The Replacements, he talked with band members, insiders and family members and got the whole story of the Minneapolis band whose disastrous, drunken shows are almost as revered as the transcendent ones.

Seratones On World Cafe

Jul 7, 2016

Shreveport, La.'s Seratones are proof that the governing spirit of punk rock is alive and well in the 21st century. Lead singer A. J. Haynes says that she'd been struggling to sound like Ella Fitzgerald and other jazz vocalists before she met up with the musicians who became Seratones. With them, she found to her great joy that blues-infused punk came much more naturally. Hear the band, which released its debut album in May, perform live in the World Cafe studio.

Love songs should be weird. Not that there's anything wrong with anthems that grab everyone's hearts in racing thump-thump-thumps (sup, RiRi), but more love songs ought to burst and break, fold and fall apart, move at an impossibly slow pace or -- gulp — not move at all. Warehouse set out to make a simple love song, but as "Reservoir" came together, the Atlanta rock band fell into love's contradictions and pulled out a tangled, jangled mess.

A number of musicians, including Beyoncé, Neko Case, Björk, Jack White and many more have been asking fans to shut off their phones at live shows for years. But just asking fans may not be enough. Last week Apple was granted a patent on technology that would use infrared signals to forcibly disable cell phone cameras at specific locations, ie. concert venues and theaters.

First Watch: Mal Blum, 'Reality TV'

Jul 7, 2016

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