The U.S. isn't the only country making stark political choices in 2016. In Scandinavia, ostensibly one of the most progressive regions on the planet (then again, maybe not), a conservative movement is picking up speed in the form of the counterintuitively named Sweden Democrats.

The guitars fade in, as if to pick up where they left off, or to suggest that they'd never stopped twinkling. "Where are we now?" Mike Kinsella sings, his voice a little worn, but softened like suede. "We're both home alone in the same house / Would you even know me if I wasn't old me? / If I wasn't afraid to say what I mean?" Just like that, 17 years after its eponymous debut, American Football returns from whence it came, with even the same house featured on the album cover.

Five years ago, Drake captured the millennial mood with a track abounding in bulletproof swagger and boasts of unconstrained indulgence. "You only live once," he luxuriated. "That's the motto."

It's common practice for musicians to sing the struggles of everyday people: underdogs and strivers who work for the weekend, love and protect their families, and struggle to stay one step ahead of the boss and the bill collector. But everyday people aren't monolithic, and some stories are told far more often than others.

Eyes On The Lines is a striking title for Steve Gunn's latest record. A trucker phrase, it captures the chooglin', highway hypnosis of the songwriter's sound. But to the untrained ear, it might suggest purposefulness or direction. This is not Gunn's artistic project. As he sings in "Night Wander," "He likes to wander / Lose direction and go back home." Even if you know where home is, there's no clean route you follow to get there. The well-defined path is a myth.

Hi, World Cafe fans! I just moved to the U.S. from Toronto, Canada, to become World Cafe's new contributing host and producer. Yes, I'm from Drake's hometown. And yes, that's the most frequently asked question since I've been here. But if your musical knowledge north of the 49th parallel doesn't extend past Drizzy and The Six, you're in luck. I brought a pile of musical gifts across the border with me.

The sweetly innocent folk-pop duo Lily & Madeleine take a disturbingly dark turn in their new video for the song "Westfield." After a brief credits sequence that apes the Netflix series Stranger Things, the sisters find themselves running from two shadowy predators on a foggy night. "Westfield, dark and blue," they sing while trying to escape.

Last week, after I played a monstrously good guitar rock cut by Major Stars, Bob Boilen rolled his eyes while foolishly claiming the guitar solo was dead. So we did an entirely scientific poll (it wasn't scientific) on Twitter to see what listeners thought. As I expected, the vast majority — nearly 70 percent — said, "No, Bob." The guitar solo is not dead.

The Claypool Lennon Delirium On World Cafe

Oct 11, 2016

The Claypool Lennon Delirium is a new psychedelic collaboration that features the minds and musical expertise of Les Claypool, renowned for his work with Primus, and Sean Lennon, who's played with bands like The Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger and is also the son of John Lennon and Yoko Ono.

As a punk band that's increasingly found itself musically — and perhaps spiritually — outside of punk, Priests has had to make sacrifices. After three EPs and a single, the Washington, D.C., band spent the last two years on its debut album, Nothing Feels Natural. Worked out in practice spaces and during numerous tours across the U.S. and Europe, these songs were originally laid to tape in Olympia, Wash., but scrapped.