Music

It's taken Blind Pilot five years to release a follow-up to 2011's We Are The Tide, and the result befits a group that moves at its own pace: And Then Like Lions unfurls slowly and gracefully, its energy directed more toward richness of sound than speed or force. The Portland, Ore., band makes wistful late-summer music — songs of reflection and connection, carried out in a subtle swirl of strings, horns, pianos and voices.

When you're young, summers tend to feel endless and carefree. For many, memories of this age — when you have the freedom to attack a day with reckless abandon — still conjure a golden-hour glow in our minds. For Hockey Dad, that vibrant spirit and defiant charm fuels its debut album, Boronia. Messy and fun, the Australian duo's pop-punk bursts with chunky guitars and big riffs as they collide with yowling vocals and firecracker drumming.

First Listen: Of Montreal, 'Innocence Reaches'

Aug 4, 2016

When Of Montreal began in the mid-'90s, leader Kevin Barnes' influences were clear: the warm '60s pop of The Beatles, The Kinks and The Beach Boys.

Oliver John-Rodgers On World Cafe

Aug 3, 2016

Originally from Virginia, Oliver John-Rodgers now lives in Nashville. That's where he's been developing his music from singer-songwriter fare into a style he calls "acid cowboy," which draws on elements of indie and psychedelic rock. His third album, Nashville Demos, sounds less like a demo tape and more like a fully-fledged studio album in its thick, layered production.

Julien Baker's music speaks to all of your nagging insecurities, the daily worries that nibble away at your well-being even as you try to suppress them. The title of her debut album, Sprained Ankle, hints at that sensibility: An ankle sprain might be a pretty mundane injury, but it's certainly going to keep you off your feet for a while — especially if, as she sings in the title song, you're a marathon runner.

earthsongs.net

 Peguis First Nation singer/songwriter William Prince just released his solo debut album Earthly Days. A member of the supergroup Indian City, he grew up singing in church and touring with his father, Ed Prince, who was a pastor. William was writing songs at age 13 and helping to produce one of his father’s albums at age 15. He was named “Aboriginal Songwriter of the Year” at the Aboriginal Peoples Choice Music Awards in 2014. The new album Earthly Days features his baritone singing voice and poetic lyrics in a style that resembles the likes of Johnny Cash or Leonard Cohen.

On this week's episode of All Songs Considered, Bob Boilen and guest host Stephen Thompson play new music from Regina Spektor, experimental rap from Clipping, which features Daveed Diggs of Hamilton, and a great synth track from singer-songwriter Lowell.

First Watch: Angelica Garcia, 'Orange Flower'

Aug 2, 2016

"I went with him to dinner / and didn't even pay / and then he called me dude the next day!" sings Angelica Garcia to a giant papier-mâché monster in her new video for the song "Orange Flower." Garcia is from Los Angeles but relocated with her family to small town Virginia, where she found herself, seventeen and alone with all the time in the world to make music without judgement.

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