Music

On "Ain't No Grave," a track from his new solo album, the singer-guitarist Luther Dickinson stares death right in the face, quite literally.

L.A. singer-songwriter Korey Dane worked with famed producer Tony Berg on his recent debut album, Youngblood. Dane caught KCRW's attention with Americana rockers and poetic ballads like this one, "Let it Be Just For Fun."

SET LIST

  • "Let It Be Just For Fun"

Watch Korey Dane's full performance at KCRW.com.

First things first: Bloodmist is a kind of a messed-up name for a band, but it perfectly describes the sonic terror therein. Jeremiah Cymerman (clarinet, electronics), Mario Diaz de Leon (guitar) and Kayo Dot's Toby Driver (bass) are three of New York City's most extreme practitioners of dark experimental music, originally brought together over a week-long residency at the Roulette in 2012. Sheen, the band's debut, hangs in the air like a malevolent spirit — yet it rarely strikes, only stares.

This Week on Earthsongs: Cheri Maracle

Jan 25, 2016
Earthsongs.net

Six Nations of the Grand River, Ontario, Cheri Maracle has a background as an actress in theater, television, and film. As a singer/songwriter, her sound incorporates traditional music, folk, and jazz, while speaking to social issues in her lyrics such as domestic abuse and the missing and murdered Aboriginal women of Canada. We’ll hear music from her 2014 album Ache of Love and also her EP entitled If I am Water. Original article click here.

How long has it been since a snarling singer and a supercharged electric guitar grabbed you by the throat and wouldn't let go?

By 2012, Emily Wells had been practicing her songwriting and multi-instrumental talents for over a decade, mostly in DIY mode. But the album she released that year, Mama, was a step up, deftly taking advantage of her intimacy with country and roots song forms, while also showcasing her prodigious experimental streak. It was a jewel — songs by turns knowing and playful, down-home and street-wise, razor sharp and intimate.

Musician Brooke Waggoner was on a 6 a.m. coffee run when she got a worrisome text from a friend, whose husband was apparently dealing with a life-threatening heart problem. The news gave her a shiver — and an idea.

Grindcore is about the economy of extreme music; about cramming as much metallic insanity into one minute as possible. It's been six years since the last album by Magrudergrind, a Brooklyn-via-D.C. trio that knows how to make the guitar-drums-vocals format sound something like fireworks exploding in an aluminum trash can.

"I could drop dead in the middle of this conversation," says Graham Nash. "But on the other hand so could you, no matter how old you are," he adds with mordant evenhandedness. Don't worry, the folk-rock elder statesman who's been one-third of Crosby, Stills & Nash since 1968 is just fine. "I have no intentions of leaving," he assures, "my health is pretty damn good. But you know what I mean."

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