Music

In the late 1960s, a lot of popular music was about peace, love, and harmony — but at the same time, an altogether different sound was emanating from a house on State Street in Ann Arbor, Michigan. It came from The Stooges, a proto-punk quartet made up of two brothers, Ron and Scott Asheton, their friend Dave Alexander and, of course, Jim Osterberg, better known as Iggy Pop.

Our guest on Friday's episode of World Cafe was Bob Weir, the founding rhythm guitarist of iconic American band the Grateful Dead.

Bob Weir On World Cafe

Nov 4, 2016

Bob Weir, songwriter, singer and rhythm guitarist of the Grateful Dead, used to be a cowboy. As a teenager, he had a job on a ranch in Wyoming and now, many years later, he's written an album about the experience called Blue Mountain.

If you love Pink Floyd like Bob Boilen and I do, chances are you've got a story or two to tell about how the band's music has figured into your life. Maybe it's the first time you heard them, or a live show you saw, or an important friendship that formed over their music. Whatever your story is, we want to hear it.

Among the hundred or so bands I saw at SXSW this year, Julia Jacklin's stark, spare voice was memorable. Her debut album is is a lovely listen — no frills. It's the final song on the record that turned out to be a favorite for me, with just the Australian singer and her electric guitar. That song, "Don't Let The Kids Win," turned out to be the last one she wrote for the album, and it's also the title track.

Review: Sleigh Bells, 'Jessica Rabbit'

Nov 3, 2016

Note: NPR's First Listen audio comes down after the album is released. However, you can still listen with the Spotify playlist at the bottom of the page.

Note: NPR's First Listen audio comes down after the album is released. However, you can still listen with the Spotify playlist at the bottom of the page.

Note: NPR's First Listen audio comes down after the album is released. However, you can still listen with the Spotify playlist at the bottom of the page.

Thelma's music sounds almost otherworldly. Slightly spooky and often dramatic, it mixes the warm, human sensibilities of folk with slightly off-kilter electronic elements. The intensity in the music makes sense, given its origins: When Natasha Jacobs, the band's founder, began to focus on songwriting, she did so with a commitment to overcome her lifelong fear of performing. A few years later, while studying composition at SUNY Purchase, Jacobs began experimenting with electronic instrumentation.

Indigo Girls On Mountain Stage

Nov 2, 2016

Indigo Girls appears on Mountain Stage, recorded live in Charleston, W.Va. One of the finest folk-rock duos of all time, Indigo Girls first began visiting Mountain Stage 25 years ago, in 1991. And from their band's beginnings in Georgia to its major-label success and beyond, Amy Ray and Emily Saliers have remained true to their artistic vision and devoted fan base.

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