News

Swing 49, the Alaskan band that tackles the Gypsy Jazz genre, swung by KNBA Friday August 26th to chat about their new Album 'Devil's Club Blues' and share some live music!  Jackie Shafer, Tovi Newman, Forrest Wilson and Logan Bean have a crisp, balanced sound that very comfortably and respectably lives in the Gypsy Jazz genre while totally adding their own Alaskan flavor.

Based on a story by Josh Edge, Alaska Public Media - Anchorage Gov. Bill Walker and the Matanuska-Susitna Borough have issued disaster declarations due to erosion and flooding in the Butte area along the Matanuska River. The flooding is due to a change in direction in the river rather than high water. If water breaks through the embankment, as many as 75 homes could be affected. State Department of Transportation and Mat-Su borough response crews are working to bring in armor rock to contain the river.

By Jenny Neyman, KBBI - Homer 

Southcentral Alaska is abuzz with winged things that pack a sharp sting. Wasps are an all-too-common problem. If you've been outside much this summer, you're probably uncomfortably familiar with the buzzing sound of wasps.

  Southcentral Alaska has seen an increase in wasp activity this year. Mild winters are good for overwintering queens, and more queens means more nests come springtime.

AVTEC Closes Anchorage Campus Due to State Budget Cuts

Aug 23, 2016

By Casey Marsh, KBBI - Homer

Alaska’s Institute of Technology, also known as AVTEC- the Alaska Vocational Technical Center- had to close the doors to their Anchorage satellite campus on Aug. 15, due to budget cuts.

Heather Beaty is the Executive Director of the Alaska Workforce Investment Board. As a spokesperson for the Department of Labor and Workforce Development, Beaty said the closure was due in part to the 33 percent budget cut to the State General Funds.

August 19, 2016

By Molly Dischner, KDLG - Dillingham

When Alaskans went to the polls this week, some had new options for language assistance. Expanded help for Yup’ik, Gwich’in and Inupiaq speakers was the result of a lawsuit brought against the state in 2013. A team of state elections officials and those involved in the lawsuit traveled to three Bristol Bay communities to see how the provisions worked out on primary day.

Tribal assistance, job programs lose funds

Aug 23, 2016

By Ed Schoenfeld, CoastAlaska News

The Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska will get about half the BIA settlement funds slated for Southeast tribal governments. Southeast Alaska’s regional tribal government is temporarily ending programs that help clients find jobs and pay for living expenses.

The Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska says Bureau of Indian Affairs budget cuts are to blame.

William Martin directs the council’s 477 programs, which are named after the federal law that funds them.

Montana State University has received a five-year $20 million dollar grant to work with several Alaska partners on health disparities facing Native communities. The project is being funded by the National Institutes of Health.

    

Alaskan artists return home. 20 years ago, this actually didn't happen as much as you think it would. Nellie Clay found her music while living in Moose Pass, Talkeetna and Anchorage. Last year she completed her 2nd full studio album and moved to Nashville.  But, you can't take the Alaskan out of this singer/songwriter. Nellie came home in August and has brought the talented Oklahoma singer John Calvin Abney with her.  Together they've infused their Red Dirt music roots with the tales only Alaskan's can tell.   

By Zacharia Hughes, Alaska Public Media

Turnout for yesterday’s primary election was low – about 15% statewide – but voters sent a clear message as a lot of incumbents lost their jobs.

The state's Republican makeup saw a rearrangment: three incumbents lost their seats, while two more failed to move from the house into the senate.

Monday (Aug. 15), Alaska Attorney General Jahna Lindemuth announced she will drop an appeal in a case involving increased tribal jurisdiction through placement of tribal lands into trust.

Trust status transfers title to those lands to the federal government, and protects the land from taxation or seizure for debt. It gives tribes greater jurisdiction and access to federal funding. Trust lands include reservations. They’re a long-standing and common feature of land management for lower 48 tribes.

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