This Week's Must Read
2:31 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

For The Midterm Elections, A Book On 'What It Takes' To Win

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 2:59 pm

In less than two weeks, Americans will go to the polls to vote in the midterm elections. At least, some of them will — about 40% of eligible voters, if past elections are any indication. This year's races have already made stars — some rising, some falling — out of Americans hoping to represent their states and districts.

Some, like Kansas Senate hopeful Greg Orman and Georgia governor candidate Jason Carter, may pull off surprising victories. Others, like Wendy Davis in the Texas governor race have seen their once bright lights fade.

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The Two-Way
1:32 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

UPDATED: Police Deputy Killed, 2 Others Shot By Assailant In California

Law enforcement officers dressed in tactical gear leave the Gold County Fairgrounds to help in the search of an assailant, in Auburn, Calif., who shot three sheriff's deputies in two Northern California Counties, on Friday.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 3:13 pm

(This post was last updated at 7:12 p.m. ET.)

One police deputy was killed and two other deputies and a civilian were shot by a gunman at two different locations in California on Friday.

After a more than four-hour-long hunt for a suspect they described as "heavily armed and dangerous," police surrounded a house in Placer County, Calif.

Dena Irwin, a spokesperson for Placer County Sheriff's office, said the suspect was 34-year-old Marcelo Marquez. Irwin said they had not established a motive.

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Goats and Soda
1:28 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

Fighting The Stigma Of Ebola With Hugs

Patient Nina Pham is hugged by Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, outside of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., on Friday. Pham was discharged after testing free of Ebola.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

When Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, hugged Dallas nurse Nina Pham on Friday it was as much to combat the stigma surrounding the deadly virus as to celebrate her being free of Ebola.

Fauci said it was an honor to treat Pham and get to know "such an extraordinary individual." Pham said she felt "fortunate and blessed" and put her trust "in God and my medical team."

Pham later met with President Obama in the Oval Office. The president and the nurse also hugged as news photographers captured the moment.

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Shots - Health News
1:20 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

For Hospitals, Doing More On Ebola May Mean Less Elsewhere

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 2:50 pm

As Bellevue Hospital in New York City treats its first patient with Ebola, other hospitals around the country are pouring resources into getting ready in case they're next.

Eighty-one percent of hospitals have started training their staff in caring for an Ebola patient, according to a survey of 1,039 members of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. They're the folks who manage infection control in hospitals.

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The Two-Way
1:18 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

Police: Remains Found Near Charlottesville Are Those Of Hannah Graham

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 2:51 pm

A body found near Charlottesville, Va., is that of missing University of Virginia student Hannah Graham, authorities in Albermarle County said on Friday.

Albermarle County police tweeted:

The AP has some background:

"Graham disappeared Sept. 13 after a night out with friends.

"The remains were found about 12 miles from campus.

"The man Graham was last seen with, 32-year-old Jesse Leroy Matthew Jr., has been charged with abduction with intent to defile Graham.

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The Two-Way
12:17 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

Shooting At Washington School Leaves 2 Dead, Including Gunman

People react as they wait at a church on Friday where students were taken to be reunited with parents following a shooting at Marysville Pilchuck High School in Marysville, Wash.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 3:09 pm

A student entered the cafeteria of a Marysville, Wash., high school and opened fire, killing one and injuring four before turning the gun on himself, police said Friday.

Television images showed students running out of Marysville-Pilchuck High School with their hands up, while police moved room to room with guns drawn.

During televised press conferences, Marysville Police Commander Robb Lamoureux said the shooter was a student of the school and that he did not know whether the second person killed was a student or a teacher.

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Goats and Soda
12:06 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

When You've Seen Subway Rats, Ebola Seems Like Nothin'

The media is all over this story: Ebola in NYC! Don Weiss, a doctor with the New York City Health Department, faces microphones outside the bowling alley visited by the physician who tested positive for the virus.
John Minchillo AP

Yesterday, public health officials announced that Ebola had been identified for the first time in both Mali, a country that neighbors Guinea, and New York City. The arrival of the virus in another West African country is a cause for concern. The World Health Organization has sent a team of health experts to manage contact tracing and infection control for the two-year-old patient.

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Goats and Soda
11:26 am
Fri October 24, 2014

Fashion Police: Why Are You Wearing Rubber Boots In Liberia?

On the streets of Liberia, chlorinated water is available for hand washing.
John Moore Getty Images

Working in Ebola hotspots is old hat for NPR. We've had reporters and photographers at the epidemic since April. Our global health correspondent Jason Beaubien has been to West Africa three times during the crisis.

This week it's my turn.

When I left the U.S. last week, I brought a list of tips from veteran Ebola reporters for keeping myself safe. Many of them are proving to be quite useful:

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Parallels
11:24 am
Fri October 24, 2014

In Southeast Turkey, A Long History Of Bloodshed And Worship

The pillars at Gobekli Tepe resemble those at Stonehenge — but pre-date them by several thousand years.
J. Pfeiffer DPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 12:33 pm

The Urfa plain in southeastern Turkey — not far from where Syrian refugees watch fighters from the so-called Islamic State wage a brutal war in the name of a primitive version of their faith — is one of the most fought-over landscapes in human civilization.

But on the plain — soaked in blood since the days when Sumerian and Assyrian kings ruled Mesopotamia — there's a place that's even older, so old that its denizens hadn't mastered the arts of pottery, writing or making war.

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