KNBA - KBC

Alexis Sallee

Host & Producer - Earthsongs

Alexis Sallee grew up in Anchorage, Alaska of Iñupiat descent. Her love for sound for film and music started at an early age and found its focus in radio when she joined the KNBA team after graduating high school. After working as an Earthsongs sound editor along with Shyanne Beatty for two years, she attended college at Full Sail University in Winter Park, FL. There she earned a Bachelors of Science in Recording Arts. Alexis now resides in Los Angeles where she hosts Earthsongs and is involved in the audio post production industry.

earthsongs.net

  Sacramento Knoxx is an Ojibwe/Chicano artist from southwest Detroit. Knoxx blends electronic and hip-hop styles of music with Indigenous, Mexican, blues, and jazz roots. Growing up, he had a sense of split identity, not entirely fitting in with the Mexican or Native communities. When Knoxx entered the hip-hop scene, he found a home for his voice. Utilizing multi-media elements to create both live and digital works, he conveys a message of healing and motivation to native and diverse communities worldwide.

earthsongs.net

  Tara Williamson is a self-proclaimed poet, provocateur, and pop singer. Born Cree, she was raised Anishnaabe and Métis in Swan Lake, Manitoba. Tara grew up with Native song, drum, and dance. Despite being the only artist in her family, she embraces the traditions of her roots as part of her musical identity. Following the jazzier folk/rock of her two EPs, Tara’s new full-length album Songs to Keep Us Warm is “engaging with the mainstream outside of Indian country”.

earthsongs.net

 In Ojibway culture, the wolf is a sacred animal. When naming his new project, Johnny Saga wanted to reference his background and culture, coming up with Wolf Saga. The Ojibway vocalist, producer, and multi-instrumentalist loves the music of the 1980’s. He blends his 80’s synth styles and contemporary indie pop rock background in the EP Auburn Nights, where he writes about growing up, going for your dreams, and looking beyond materialism.

earthsongs.net

  Twin Flames returns to Earthsongs with their new album Signal Fire. Husband and wife Chelsey June (Métis from Ottawa) and Jaaji (Inuk/Mohawk from Nunavik) pay tribute to each other and their Indigenous roots, taking their folk sound into more contemporary territory. Co-producing this album and incorporating throat singing and instruments from all over the world, like the didjeridoo and the bodhrán, Twin Flames achieve depth in both soundscape and content.

  This week, connect to Earthsongs at www.nv1.org.  The Native American Music Awards were formed in 1998 to promote appreciation and awareness of Indigenous musicians and create new music initiatives for the Native community. Two decades and many cities later, the awards submissions have increased from 56 to now more than 200 recordings. The show gathers larger and larger audiences each year both nationally and internationally.

earthsongs.net

Cody Blackbird is the founder, vocalist, and flutist of The Cody Blackbird Band. Eastern Band Cherokee and Dakota, Cody is the youngest ever Native American Music Awards “Flutist of the Year” nominee. He is passionate about motivating and inspiring Native youth as well as incorporating Native flute into contemporary music. The Cody Blackbird Band features Native flute blended with classic rock and blues in a style they like to call “alterNative fusion”. The band tours worldwide, recently returning from playing at High Spirits Flutes 25th anniversary in Japan.

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John McLeod is a Métis musician of the Sapotaweyak Ojibwa tribe. John has been composing and performing music for more than 30 years. With traditional country and blues elements, he brings a spiritual voice to his songs. In the process of fighting to overcome hardship, John dedicated himself to music. He found a second chance at life after undergoing triple bypass surgery and succeeded in sharing his music worldwide. As well as touring North America and Canada, he was inducted into the South Australia Country Music Hall of Fame in 2011.

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  Grammy award-winning producer, artist, and activist David Strickland connects hip-hop and Indigenous culture with the 2017 album Spirit of Hip Hop. Born and raised in the projects of Scarborough, Ontario, he evolved from b-boy into DJ, MC, engineer, and producer. Embracing his Mi’kmaq and Northern Cree ancestry, David discovered strong ties between modern hip-hop and native music traditions. He made it his passion to shed light on the similarities and bring artists together.

www.earthsongs.net

 

Peguis First Nation singer/songwriter William Prince just released his solo debut album Earthly Days. A member of the supergroup Indian City, he grew up singing in church and touring with his father, Ed Prince, who was a pastor. William was writing songs at age 13 and helping to produce one of his father’s albums at age 15. He was named “Aboriginal Songwriter of the Year” at the Aboriginal Peoples Choice Music Awards in 2014. The album Earthly Days features his baritone singing voice and poetic lyrics in a style that resembles the likes of Johnny Cash or Leonard Cohen.

earthsongs.net

Thea Hopkins is a member of the Wampanoag Tribe of Aquinnah, Martha’s Vineyard. She is also part Iroquois, African-American, Irish, French, and Portugese. She tours internationally with her Americana/Contemporary Folk style, being compared to icons such as Nick Drake and Bob Dylan.

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