KNBA - KBC

Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium

MICHAEL DINNEEN / ALASKA NATIVE HEALTH CONSORTIUM BOARD OF DIRECTORS

 

By Joaqlin Estus, KNBA

A Yup’ik woman from the Bristol Bay region known as one of the people who created the Alaska tribal health system and a savvy national advocate died Tuesday [Jan. 10]. For nearly 50 years, Sally Smith played a key role in transforming an under-funded, under-staffed and ill-equipped health system for Natives into one that is a model for tribal self-governance.

Oct. 6, 2016

By Joaqlin Estus, KNBA

Hospitals typically are not in the business of providing legal aid to patients, but several tribal health facilities in Alaska are going to start doing just that. The pilot project is being funded through a multi-state grant that's placing AmeriCorps volunteers in tribal facilities in six states.

Local governments win against oil companies on value of taxable property

By Associated Press

The Supreme Court in Alaska has upheld a ruling that the trans-Alaska oil pipeline was worth far more than a billion a year the pipeline owners claimed for the years 2007 through 2009. The Fairbanks Daily News-Miner reports that the court late last month affirmed a Superior Court ruling in 2011 that the pipeline was worth $8.9 billion to $9.6 billion those years.

Sept. 3, 2015

Change affects whether villages can get funds to fix existing water and sewer systems or only to replace them

By Joaqlin Estus, KNBA, with assistance from Matthew Smith, KNOM

Joaqlin Estus / KNBA

Sept. 3, 2015

President Obama names Denali Commission as lead agency for coastal communities threatened by climate change

Based on a story by Zach Hughes, APRN

Wednesday in Kotzebue, President Obama continued his focus on climate change in Alaska by announcing that the Denali Commission will take the lead in dealing with coastal communities threatened by disastrous flooding, erosion and thawing permafrost.

Joaqlin Estus / KNBA

The slide show above gives glimpses of life in the dozens of villages in Alaska that lack flush toilets and running water. 

To find out more, click on the links below, Parts 1-5, to see and hear the series "Kick the Bucket: Rural Sanitation in Alaska." 

“Alaska is, frankly, the best model that should be exported to other parts of the country."

Ten years ago, the American Dental Association unsuccessfully sued to get the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium to halt its Alaska Dental Health Therapist (DHAT) program. Now that program has won a national award for its innovative approach to providing Alaska Natives with dental care. And the idea is expanding to other states.

Joaqlin Estus / KNBA

 Housing to increase access to health services for Alaska Natives

Tribal, federal, state, and private sector leaders Wednesday {may 20, 2015] kicked off construction of housing at the Alaska Native Medical Center saying it will improve services for Alaska Native and American Indian people who travel to Anchorage from across the state for health care. A state Senator who helped get the project financed says it will also save the state millions of dollars a year for years to come. 

State contributes 25% required match for federal funds

Members of the Legislative Bush Caucus last week in a “Lunch and Learn” session on rural sanitation were told about 900 million dollars is needed to build, replace and maintain rural sanitation systems. Last year the state put about $9 million, and federal agencies put $51 million, toward rural sanitation in Alaska. The combined 60 million dollars is less than half the amount allocated ten years ago.

Use of “honey buckets” is on the rise as funding falls and costly systems fail

By Johanna Eurich

Water and sewer sanitation are still a challenge in many rural Alaska villages. Experts in water and sewer sanitation attending a meeting last week say a recent trend is taking honey buckets out of the museum and putting them back into villages. 

Despite progress and billions spent building water and sewage systems, many villagers in remote places like the Yukon Kuskokwim region still haul water and use a bucket instead of a toilet -- every day.

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