KNBA - KBC

ANCSA

Koahnic Broadcast Corporation

Our guests this morning on Our Community were from Perseverance Theatre - 

Actor Frank Henry Kaash Katasse, Director Randy Reinholz,  and Art Director Art Rotch came by to share the play, William Inc., which opens tomorrow with a pay-as-you can preview.  

William Inc. is written by Alaska Native playwright Lucas Rowley and features lead character William, a therapist and recovering addict himself, who lives on the Kenai, coping with daily life pressures by forming an ANCSA corporation in his head.  

Koahnic Broadcast Corporation

Our guest for Morning Line today: David Clark, Legislative Assistant with the Alaska Native Village Corporation Association, shared about an event hosted tomorrow:

Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act Panel Discussion: Diversity of Village Corporations

February 23

7pm

Rasmuson Hall on UAA Campus

Monday (Aug. 15), Alaska Attorney General Jahna Lindemuth announced she will drop an appeal in a case involving increased tribal jurisdiction through placement of tribal lands into trust.

Trust status transfers title to those lands to the federal government, and protects the land from taxation or seizure for debt. It gives tribes greater jurisdiction and access to federal funding. Trust lands include reservations. They’re a long-standing and common feature of land management for lower 48 tribes.

 5/12/16

Lawyers say state could be on the hook for tens of millions of dollars over Anchorage Legislative offices. After a judge ruled the building's lease was illegal, Legislators opted to lease a mid-town building.

Myron Naneng, long-time head of the Association of Village Council Presidents, abruptly resigns amid allegations of misspent federal funds.

Alaska performer Jack Dalton arrested for alleged sexual abuse of a minor.

Statewide Native claims leader, lobbyist John Borbridge, Jr., a Tlingit from Juneau, died Tuesday. 

Feb. 24, 2016

Professorship comes with $20,000 to support research

By Joaqlin Estus, KNBA - Anchorage

Oct. 13, 2015

Governor, Anchorage Mayor declare second Monday of October Indigenous Peoples Day

Alaska is now the first state to recognize the second Monday in October as Indigenous Peoples Day instead of Columbus Day. Governor Bill Walker signed the proclamation Monday morning, on the heels of a similar announcement by Anchorage Mayor Ethan Berkowitz. First Alaskans Institute President Liz Medicine Crow made the announcement at the Elders and Youth Conference.

Sovereignty over tribal lands the subject of Gov. Walker meetings in rural Alaska

In 2006 tribes sued the federal government over the right to transfer tribal lands into federal ownership, or trust status, which would give tribes wider control over laws and management of lands, while restricting the power of the state. Trust status also has tax implications. The state of Alaska argued Alaskan tribal rights to apply to put land into trust were extinguished by the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of 1971.

Alaskan tribes allowed to exercise same rights as lower 48 tribes

Tribes in Alaska are celebrating a decision that allows them to apply to have lands placed into trust status with the federal government. The Department of Interior issued regulations settling a long-running dispute between Interior, the state of Alaska, and tribes over an interpretation of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of 1971 (ANCSA). 

William Walsh, age 61, is filing suit in federal court to overturn his exile from an Interior Alaska village of 240 people. The Tanana tribe banned him after two Alaska State Troopers were killed on May 1, 2014. Walsh was the leader of a small group that didn't recognize the state of Alaska's authority. He clashed with the tribal government as well. The Fairbanks Daily News Miner reports Walsh squatted on private and tribal lands, claiming ownership.

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