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global warming

9/2/15

Yesterday, President Obama announced he wants to beef up the nation's fleet of icebreakers. We have more on that below. First is this report from APRN's Washington, D.C. correspondent, who followed the President in Seward.

President Obama highlights climate change effects to Exit Glacier

By Liz Ruskin, APRN

Climate change, Alaska Native issues high profile during President Obama visit to Alaska

Alaska Native issues will be the subject of high-level international attention during President Obama’s three-day visit to Alaska that begins today [Monday]. The president has scheduled a listening session with Alaska Native leaders today to discuss climate change, and economic issues. He’s expected to announce a new initiative to help dozens of Native communities facing destruction by erosion and flooding due to the effects of climate change.

Climate change will shape U.S. Coast Guard cadets' careers more than earlier generations says President

President Obama discussed Alaska, climate change, and Arctic issues in a speech last week [May 20] at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy commencement. He told cadets they’re part of the first generation of officers to begin their service in a world where the effects of climate change he says are so clearly upon us.

www.north-slope.org

Climate change and Alaska Natives: Food security

By Joaqlin Estus

Here's the second in our series on Climate Change and Alaska Natives.

Wild foods are important to Alaskans, and especially to rural residents, but, subsistence users and scientists say climate change is affecting wildlife populations, access to subsistence resources, and food preservation.

Climate Change and Alaska Natives 2014

Dec 4, 2014
Photo by Joaqlin Estus / KNBA

KNBA presents a radio series: Climate Change and Alaska Natives, broadcast December 8-12, 2014 during KNBA Morning News at 7:30 and 8:30 a.m. The five-part series builds on our past climate change coverage.  

Let us know what you think:  TAKE THE SURVEY HERE

The focus of the series is on the effects of climate change on Alaska Native homelands, and the traditional practice of gathering and sharing food from the land and sea. 

Sen. Mark Begich concedes race to Dan Sullivan

Nov 18, 2014

Sen. Mark Begich concedes, lagging by 6,211 votes with few ballots left to count

AP Photo/NOAA, Corey Accardo

Due to shrinking and disappearing sea ice caused by climate change, tens of thousands of Pacific walrus have hauled out on shore near Pt. Lay, a village in Northwest Alaska far from their feeding grounds. During a press teleconference Wednesday (Oct. 1), Joel Garlich Miller, a biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, said the haul-out of 35,000 walrus this time of year in this location is a change from the past.

As President Obama announces his intention to vastly expand a south  Pacific marine sanctuary, a scientist at a State Department conference in Washington, D.C., say ocean acidification is affecting all sea life. Ove Hoegh-Guldberg says the acidic marine climate is preventing some animals from forming skeletons and shells, and preventing reproduction. It will take 10,000 years, or 300 generations of humans, he says, to reverse the trend.