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permafrost

9/20/16

The lack of running water and flush toilets in more than three thousand Alaska homes causes health problems, but another issue looms even larger:  that’s the effects of climate change on drinking water sources. That’s according to scientists at the international Water Innovations for Healthy Arctic Homes conference in Anchorage this week. 

April 4, 2016

Sen. Murkowski opposes hearing on U.S. Supreme Court nominee until new president is elected

by The Associated Press

Alaska Sen. Lisa Murkowski says she hasn't settled on which Republican presidential candidate she will support. But Steve Wackowski, the GOP senator's campaign manager, says Murkowski will not back a Democratic hopeful.

President Obama to focus on climate change during a visit to Alaska

By Monica Gokey, KSKA – Anchorage

President Obama is visiting Alaska later this month. Thursday morning the president explained why in a video on his upcoming visit.  

“I’m going because Alaskans are on the front lines of one of the greatest challenges we face this century – climate change. You see, climate change once seemed like a problem for future generations. “

But, he says, climate change is a reality, and its effects are apparent across the country, including Alaska.

kml.gina.alaska.edu

Here is the last in KNBA’s 5-part series on Climate Change and Alaska Natives.

As we’ll see, the effects of warming temperatures on infrastructure can be costly and sometimes dramatic.

In much of Alaska, bridges, roads, buildings, and runways have been built on permafrost. That’s soil that became frozen during ice ages from 400 to 10,000 years ago, and a few feet down is frozen rock-hard year around.

Climate Change and Alaska Natives 2014

Dec 4, 2014
Photo by Joaqlin Estus / KNBA

KNBA presents a radio series: Climate Change and Alaska Natives, broadcast December 8-12, 2014 during KNBA Morning News at 7:30 and 8:30 a.m. The five-part series builds on our past climate change coverage.  

Let us know what you think:  TAKE THE SURVEY HERE

The focus of the series is on the effects of climate change on Alaska Native homelands, and the traditional practice of gathering and sharing food from the land and sea.