pollution

Local News
8:23 pm
Mon August 11, 2014

8/12/14 KNBA News - Canadian, U.S. tribes differ on mining benefits, hazards

8:30 a.m. Newscast: Some Alaska tribal organizations say last week's (Aug. 4) dam break at a British Columbia mine shows what could happen closer to home. The groups say similiar dams planned for several newar-border mines could damage or destroy fish runs in both countries. But some British Columbia tribal governments strongly support development. CoastAlaska's Ed Schoenfeld reports.

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Local News
7:13 am
Mon August 11, 2014

8/11/14 KNBA News - British Columbia officials, critics dispute spilled tailings pond waters

British Columbia Environment Ministry officials say water that poured out of a massive mine-tailings pond last week appears to be safe, and won't harm the Fraser River salmon run just getting underway. The Ministry says early tests showed levels of dissolved metals and acid are within government standards. But they also say more tests are needed; the tests could not measure all dissolved metals. The escaped wastewater and silt could fill almost 6,000 Olympic-size swimming pools, almost three times an earlier estimate. Critics say provincial water-quality standards are too weak.

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Local News
6:34 pm
Tue August 5, 2014

8/6/14 KNBA News - A Canadian tailings dam break prompts fears pollution will reach Alaskan waters

CoastAlaska's Ed Schoenfeld reports a tailings dam break at a British Columbia copper and gold mine could threaten Southeast Alaska salmon fisheries, according to critics who say similar dams closer to the border could suffer the same fate, polluting Alaskan waters.

The Environmental Protection Agency has awarded $888,000 to the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium for research on climate change and contaminant shifts, and effects on human health in rural communities. The grant is one of six given out nationwide. The study will focus on traditional foods.

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Local News
8:42 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

6/18/14 KNBA News - Ocean acidification affecting all sea life, from photoplankton to whales

As President Obama announces his intention to vastly expand a south  Pacific marine sanctuary, a scientist at a State Department conference in Washington, D.C., say ocean acidification is affecting all sea life. Ove Hoegh-Guldberg says the acidic marine climate is preventing some animals from forming skeletons and shells, and preventing reproduction. It will take 10,000 years, or 300 generations of humans, he says, to reverse the trend.

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Local News
8:00 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

6/3/14 KNBA News -

The University of Alaska develops plans for employee furloughs in case it temporarily and unexpectedly runs out of money.

The Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation began handing out pink slips due to an $11.7 million budget shortfall.

In Fairbanks, new emission control requirements will lead to a rate hike for Golden Valley Electric  Association customers.

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