salmon

Alaska not affected by this round of layoffs

Associated Press

British Petroleum announced yesterday it is laying off 3,000 positions from its worldwide marketing and refining operations. That comes on top of 4-thousands layoffs BP announced last month in its global production and exploration units. However, a spokesperson says this round of cuts will not affect Alaska. BP does expect to cut about 260 jobs in Alaska this year. 

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By Ben Matheson, KYUK

The path to unified management of Kuskokwim salmon stocks is uncharted, but along the way, the newly established Kuskokwim River Inter Tribal Fisheries Commission wants  involvement at each step. That begins with tribal consultation in preparations for another summer of sacrifice. The commission’s inaugural meeting wrapped up Wednesday in Bethel.

By Daysha Eaton, KYUK

The Alaska Court of Appeals has affirmed a lower court’s decision that Yup’ik Fishermen who fished for King salmon during a state closure should be convicted. The decision was issued Friday (March 27). 

The Attorney for the Yup’ik Fishermen is James Davis with the Northern Justice Project. He says the court asked the wrong question:

3/3/15 - Tuluksak again without power

Mar 2, 2015

$600,000 need to fix problems caused by poor management, maintenance

Tuluksak residents are now on the backup to the backup electric generator. The state flew out a second generator over the weekend after part of the fan assembly failed Thursday, leaving the community without power for days for the second time in four months. Power was restored Sunday. Alaska Energy Authority Policy and Outreach Manager Emily Ford says the latest failure is not a complete surprise.

    

Trespassing bison on Kodiak safe from hunters               

Construction of cables under Arctic waters between England and Japan, and overland from Prudhoe to Anchorage inching forward

Oil and gas leases in Bristol Bay on indefinite hold

U.S. District Court Judge H. Russel Holland Monday put a temporary hold on the EPA's 404(c) process on the Pebble Mine, a process that allows EPA to restrict or prohibit projects that could have adverse effects on fishery areas. EPA's February decision to initiate the process was based on a Bristol Bay Watershed Assessment it completed in January.

The Pebble Limited Partnership contends that while EPA was developing that assessment, it violated the Federal Advisory Committee Act, which ensures advisory committees are objective and accessible to the public.

Hundreds of people turned out in Anchorage Tuesday to comment on a proposal that would severely restrict development of the massive gold-and-copper Pebble mine in the Bristol Bay region Opponents of the mine say it poses to great a threat to salmon. Others say the project should be allowed to move through the permitting process before any action is taken to curtail development.

8:30 a.m. Newscast: Some Alaska tribal organizations say last week's (Aug. 4) dam break at a British Columbia mine shows what could happen closer to home. The groups say similiar dams planned for several newar-border mines could damage or destroy fish runs in both countries. But some British Columbia tribal governments strongly support development. CoastAlaska's Ed Schoenfeld reports.

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