Sept. 25, 2015

Kotzebue Nursing Home Serving Traditional Foods

Associated Press

Residents of a nursing home in Kotzebue now have musk ox and other traditional native foods on the menu. It's part of a program under a new federal law that allows donated food to be served at nursing homes, child nutrition programs and other public and nonprofit facilities, including those run by Indian tribes and tribal groups.


Oct. 27, 2015

Gas pipeline partner supports state buyout proposal

A TransCanada Corp. spokesman says the company respects Gov. Bill Walker's wishes to take on an increased role in a proposed natural gas project. Walker has argued a buyout would give Alaska a greater say in the project. A TransCanada  official is scheduled to appear at legislative hearings Wednesday and Thursday.


Nome port study put on hold

By Matthew Smith, KNOM – Nome

President Obama to focus on climate change during a visit to Alaska

By Monica Gokey, KSKA – Anchorage

President Obama is visiting Alaska later this month. Thursday morning the president explained why in a video on his upcoming visit.  

“I’m going because Alaskans are on the front lines of one of the greatest challenges we face this century – climate change. You see, climate change once seemed like a problem for future generations. “

But, he says, climate change is a reality, and its effects are apparent across the country, including Alaska.

By Ben Matheson, KYUK

The path to unified management of Kuskokwim salmon stocks is uncharted, but along the way, the newly established Kuskokwim River Inter Tribal Fisheries Commission wants  involvement at each step. That begins with tribal consultation in preparations for another summer of sacrifice. The commission’s inaugural meeting wrapped up Wednesday in Bethel.

by Ben Matheson, KYUK

Federal staff will again manage king salmon on the lower Kuskokwim River after requests from tribes. Earlier this year, a handful of tribal governments asked the federal subsistence board to implement federal management. The Federal Subsistence Board deferred last month, but at a Friday meeting of the Kuskokwim River Salmon Management Working group, US Fish and Wildlife Service leaders announced a plan for federal management.

By Daysha Eaton, KYUK

The Alaska Court of Appeals has affirmed a lower court’s decision that Yup’ik Fishermen who fished for King salmon during a state closure should be convicted. The decision was issued Friday (March 27). 

The Attorney for the Yup’ik Fishermen is James Davis with the Northern Justice Project. He says the court asked the wrong question:

Courtesy KRBD FM, Ketchikan, AK

  Aid to needy families, state child support services funding at risk

State officials have said federal funding could be on the line if the Legislature does not act to change Alaska child support payment laws. Two pools of money would be affected: $19 million for the state's child support services division and $45 million for Temporary Aid for Needy Families.


Legislators propose cuts to state transportation budget

Goal of tribal same-sex policy is inclusion of all tribal members

Trespassing bison on Kodiak safe from hunters       

Climate change and Alaska Natives: Food security

By Joaqlin Estus

Here's the second in our series on Climate Change and Alaska Natives.

Wild foods are important to Alaskans, and especially to rural residents, but, subsistence users and scientists say climate change is affecting wildlife populations, access to subsistence resources, and food preservation.