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Music

The Lumineers may have on the pop scene out of nowhere — scoring a worldwide hit with the band's self-titled 2012 debut album and its multimillion-selling single "Ho Hey" — but the Denver group had tooled around in obscurity for quite a few years before its breakthrough. These days, though, it's one of the biggest folk-rock outfits in the business, joining a suspenders-clad Mount Rushmore with the likes of Mumford & Sons.

Last weekend the Gaslight Anthem's Brian Fallon lashed out at his audience; an audience that had already been lashed by winds and rain during what was pretty terrific set in a spectacular new waterfront venue in lower Manhattan.

When Big Country founder and lead singer Stuart Adamson died in 2001, most would have assumed that the Scottish band was finished. But in 2007, the group reunited for a 25th-anniversary tour with a new lead singer in its lineup. Though Adamson was a hard man to replace, Big Country found comfort in recording and playing with Mike Peters, formerly of The Alarm.

Viking's Choice: Kayo Dot, 'Thief'

Aug 2, 2013

There's a lot to absorb in the 100 minutes that make up Hubardo, an ambitious concept album about a meteor that falls to earth and transforms a lonely poet.

KCRW Presents: Savages

Aug 1, 2013

Hearing the controlled intensity of Savages' music is one thing, but watching the band perform live is another altogether. When we welcomed the U.K. post-punk group to KCRW's studios, its members brought with them powerful energy and a moody aesthetic that they've been carefully cultivating throughout a short but successful career. In a whirlwind set, Savages ripped through an assortment of its songs, including the single "She Will."

Try as I might, I could never skateboard. It's as if gravity didn't know what to make of my body and would send me flying face-first into the concrete at every opportunity. That never stopped me from watching skate videos on late-night cable-access TV — pinhole cameras, bloody wipeouts and punk rock. Way before it was the mind-mangling noise band that once turned an unsuspecting Sub Pop audience on its head with bangers like 2004's "Stabbed in the Face," Wolf Eyes was just a bunch of punks from Detroit.

We get a lot of mail at NPR Music, and amid the helpful $40-a-pop reminders not to speed on North Capitol Street is a slew of smart questions about how music fits into our lives. This week: a discussion of cellphone recordings at concerts.

Alaska Athabascan Indian moose skin Drum making and Birch Bark Baby Carrier construction.

Live demonstration at the Native Heritage Center in Anchorage {Aug 24, 2010)

"They look like the kids from Stand By Me or an old Norman Rockwell painting canted a few degrees," director Eddie O'Keefe says of the teenaged Chicago garage-rock group The Orwells. "I wanted to capture that aspect of the band in a video." The Orwells' new song, "Who Needs You," is the title track from an upcoming EP, out Sept. 10.

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