Music

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  In Ojibway culture, the wolf is a sacred animal. When naming his new project, Johnny Saga wanted to reference his background and culture, coming up with Wolf Saga. The Ojibway vocalist, producer, and multi-instrumentalist loves the music of the 1980’s. He blends his 80’s synth styles and contemporary indie pop rock background in the EP Auburn Nights, where he writes about growing up, going for your dreams, and looking beyond materialism.

Only three people in history have sold more than 100 million albums as both a solo act and a member of a band: Paul McCartney, Michael Jackson — and Phil Collins. Collins joined Genesis as the band's drummer in 1970. Five years later, he became the frontman when lead singer Peter Gabriel left.

If you're looking of a break from the relentless assault of gut-churning news headlines, you've come to the right place! For this week's show I thought I'd send a little bit of good cheer into the world with some big, joyful group sing-alongs that celebrate life and all its gloriousness.

The first burst of light and love comes from the London-based band Crystal Fighters and its anthem to how momentary and magical life is. I follow with Fialta, a group from California with a simple message: We're all in this together.

Since 2009, Seattle's Erin Birgy has led the mutating group Mega Bog, which originally started jamming together after a group swimming trip. The project's thoroughly Aquarian origins are evident in its weird and comforting wooze, which unites the jazzy ease of Chicago's The Sea And Cake with dub's slippery mysticism and lackadaisical guitar solos that unspool like lava-lamp bubbles.

Last week, World Cafe landed in Nashville to kick off World Cafe Nashville, a series of upcoming studio sessions and events showcasing the broad, vibrant musical landscape of Music City. There's definitely something in the water there, and with World Cafe Nashville, we'll be tapping into what makes that music scene tick. At our Oct.

The New York City duo The Shacks is made up of Shannon Wise and Max Shrager, who are 18 and 20 years old, respectively. The band's new, self-titled EP includes its first single, "Strange Boy," and some similarly atmospheric songs. Wise's voice belies her age, and with Shrager's production, this sounds like the early work of a force to be reckoned with. Hear two songs in the audio segment.

Adia Victoria has traveled a long way since she dropped out of high school in South Carolina. She impulsively hopped to London and Paris, to New York City and back to the American South. In Atlanta, she learned guitar and steeped herself in the blues, which she says represented "the first time in my life that I felt connected to my blackness and to my Southernness." Finally, it was on to Nashville.

Grandaddy will release its first new album in more than a decade next year. It's called Last Place and is due out March 3 on Danger Mouse's 30th Century Records.

This week, Phil Collins released a memoir called Not Dead Yet. As if to prove the title's truth, he also announced new tour dates. Collins isn't dead yet, nor are many of his pioneering contemporaries — in fact, boomer musicians seem to be having a bit of a pop-culture moment.

Four years ago, the world learned the name Pussy Riot, a politically active Russian art collective whose members were all women. Members of that group staged a punk rock demonstration in a church in protest of Russian president Vladimir Putin and the Russian church's support of his presidential campaign.

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