KNBA - KBC

Alaska Native Heritage Center

Koahnic Broadcast Corporation

Our Guest this Morning on Our Community is Alaska Native Heritage Center Public Relations & Marketing Manager Kelsey Wallace - and she was at KNBA to let us know about the Circumpolar World Music Celebration this coming Saturday at the Alaska Native Heritage Center. 

Wallace says this is the 15th year ANHC is hosting this celebration, and this year there are a few things different, in response to what community members say they want: the artists featured reflect an urban style, and the time of the event is later in the day. 

As Heard on Morning Line: ANHC Bazaar

Nov 22, 2017
Koahnic Broadcast Corporation

Today’s guest on Morning Line is Kelsey Wallace, the Marketing Director for the Alaska Native Heritage Center.  Coming up the first week of December is a fun  way to start the holiday season;

The ANHC Holiday Bazaar

December 2nd and 3rd, 10am to 5pm

Wallace says the event usually features not only customary and traditional art forms, but also contemporary arts and crafts and works in other mediums like photography.

Koahnic Broadcast Corporation

This weekend the Alaska Native Heritage Center is hosting it's Fall Festival, an annual event, and this year it coincides with Halloween.  

The event offers up trick-or-treating, ghost stories, and live entertainment from Todd Grebe and Cold Country, tomorrow starting at Noon.  

Kelsey Wallace, Public Relations and Marketing Manager, says one storyteller, John Active, is flying all the way from Bethel to tell stories.  "When John Active comes, it's a real crowd-pleaser.  He'll be on the stage at certain times throughout the day." 

Joaqlin Estus / Koahnic Broadcasting

Testifying in a voters' rights case, Division of Elections Director Gail Fenumiai says villages with sizable populations of limited English speakers beat the state's average turnout in the 2012 Presidential election. However, absentee and early ballots are not counted in turnout numbers. She was testifying in a case in which villages and elders say the state failed to provide complete translations of voting materials into Native languages. The state says it has met legal requirements.