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By The Associated Press

Oct. 3, 2016 - A leadership dispute is expected to be continued at a 3-day conference of the Association of Village Council Presidents kicking off in Bethel Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2016. Protesting delegates plan to push their argument that the member villages are in charge of the regional nonprofit, not executive leadership. Protesters say the organization's executive board and their attorneys have hijacked authority from the tribes that created it decades ago to advocate for 56 Alaska Native communities.

Tribal assistance, job programs lose funds

Aug 23, 2016

By Ed Schoenfeld, CoastAlaska News

The Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska will get about half the BIA settlement funds slated for Southeast tribal governments. Southeast Alaska’s regional tribal government is temporarily ending programs that help clients find jobs and pay for living expenses.

The Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska says Bureau of Indian Affairs budget cuts are to blame.

William Martin directs the council’s 477 programs, which are named after the federal law that funds them.

By Wesley Early, Alaska Public Media

Tribes across the country would have new opportunities to reclaim lost artifacts under a new Senate bill. The Safeguard Tribal Objects of Patrimony, or STOP Act, would prevent the export of cultural and religious items.

Martin Heinrich is the junior senator from New Mexico who introduced the STOP Act to the Senate.

“It’s time to make sure that items that are deeply religious or deeply connected to individual tribes are respected, are not sold on the auction block,” Heinrich said.

The first bill to come out of the Legislative special session may be one that streamlines handling of children in state custody. All the testimony yesterday [Wednesday] before the Senate Judiciary Committee supported passage of House Bill 200.

In Northwest Alaska, tax increase prompts lawsuit

By the Associated Press

A world-class zinc mine operating in northwest Alaska is suing the Northwest Arctic Borough, claiming the borough has enacted an unfair severance tax. TeckAlaska claims the tax will double or triple payments by the Red Dog Mine to the borough.

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Tribes seek info on AVCP layoffs and alleged mishandling of federal funds

By Joaqlin Estus, KNBA - Anchorage

Jan. 12, 2016

A bill to facilitate speedier enforcement of tribal protective orders to go before Legislators

By Molly Dischner, KDLG – Dillingham

Among the 31 bills filed in advance of this year’s Legislative session and released Friday (Jan. 8, 2016) is one that would direct the state of Alaska to recognize protective orders issued by tribal governments. That was submitted by Dillingham Representative Bryce Edgmon.

Climate change, Alaska Native issues high profile during President Obama visit to Alaska

Alaska Native issues will be the subject of high-level international attention during President Obama’s three-day visit to Alaska that begins today [Monday]. The president has scheduled a listening session with Alaska Native leaders today to discuss climate change, and economic issues. He’s expected to announce a new initiative to help dozens of Native communities facing destruction by erosion and flooding due to the effects of climate change.

  Alaska's largest tribe is boycotting FedEx, a sponsor of the Washington, D.C. NFL team whose name and mascot many consider derogatory to Native Americans. The Juneau Empire reports the Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska announced Thursday that it has told tribal employees use of FedEx services will be discontinued.  FedEx is one of the team's top sponsors and owns naming rights to the Washington D.C. stadium. 

Wayside closures will affect travelers on Glenn, Richardson and Tok Cutoff highways

Joaqlin Estus / KNBA

 Housing to increase access to health services for Alaska Natives

Tribal, federal, state, and private sector leaders Wednesday {may 20, 2015] kicked off construction of housing at the Alaska Native Medical Center saying it will improve services for Alaska Native and American Indian people who travel to Anchorage from across the state for health care. A state Senator who helped get the project financed says it will also save the state millions of dollars a year for years to come. 

The Alaska House and Senate are moving their work from Juneau to Anchorage. Legislative majority leaders made the announcement the same day the Governor warned state workers of massive layoffs if the Legislature doesn't approve a fully-funded budget. A quarter of the state's 16,000 employees work in Juneau. KTOO's Lisa Phu talked with some of them on their lunch hour at the State Office Building in Juneau.

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